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Uwmopic
12-01-2009, 05:59 PM
I'm new to this forum, not overly computer literate, and eagerly looking forward to Scarlet. Seems like it will be a lot like shooting with a film camera (which I miss) rather than a camcorder.

My big question right now is, "will my editing system support 3k video?". I've been reading the threads, but it's still a little murky to me.

I'm presently using (and I had to look all this up) an iMac, OS 10.6, 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 3 GB 667 SDRAM, 250 GB internal and 3 TB external hard drives, editing in Final Cut Pro 7.0.

Any help will be appreciated.

Anthocl
12-01-2009, 06:18 PM
I think a 2GHz C2D isnt enought for 3K ... you need at least a quad core if you want it to be somewhat manageable. Again i'll let the experienced members give you a better answer .

Uwmopic
12-01-2009, 06:22 PM
Thanks. My big concern is that I can afford the camera, but not camera and a new computer system at the same time.

Phil999
12-01-2009, 06:34 PM
the question is more about speed. It is even possible to edit 4K r3d-files with a netbook. So it will surely work with your current computer. Just add some internal hard-disks, and upgrade the computer in a year or two.

Granty
12-01-2009, 06:36 PM
I think this is a large factor that will count many people out, spend $5k on a nice new camera and then need $1.5-2k on a system to edit and harddrives for backup.

The best solution is maybe build a Phenom II quad system just for that edit, you can spec these up cheap, you you can setup a good proxy file workflow on the core 2 setup.

But I wouldn't rule the specs out just yet, depending on motherboard, Hard drive and memory, you may just squeeze a real-time 2-3k edit out.

Ameer Azari
12-02-2009, 04:33 PM
I'm just gonna go ahead, get a Scarlet...and try to work something out on the iMac I'm currently using: 2.8 Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo

4GB (2x2GB) 667 DDR2 SDRAM

500 GB Hard drive...

Which is probably a really stupid plan...but hey, I've done worse and gotten away with it...like not revising for my A-Levels...that nearly turned out badly...nearly...

David Rasberry
12-02-2009, 04:41 PM
With FCP and low res proxies, editing with the dual core CPU'S shouldn't be too awful. Rendering to final output format from the original files may be pretty slow. Main thing is that you will need Terabytes of storage space to handle the file sizes for a lot of footage. Think about adding some sort of external RAID 5 array thru FW800 or Gigabit Ethernet interface.

dmpsk8
12-02-2009, 05:18 PM
do you need to work in 3k. I can tell you i don't plan using a full 3k start to finish workflow very often. It's just not cost effective for all projects.

Uwmopic
12-03-2009, 09:25 AM
Thanks for the info, it helps with my decision. And, though I hadn't thought of it, Kevin's right, I won't need 3K for everything, so, that helps also. Thanks again.

David Rasberry
12-03-2009, 10:13 AM
You can always pick your shots from originals and render out of Redcine or Redrushes to Prores then edit in Prores, or shoot the scaled 1080P mode if finish is for HD anyway.

Jerrod Cordell
12-04-2009, 12:29 PM
I'm just gonna go ahead, get a Scarlet...and try to work something out on the iMac I'm currently using: 2.8 Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo

4GB (2x2GB) 667 DDR2 SDRAM

500 GB Hard drive...

Which is probably a really stupid plan...but hey, I've done worse and gotten away with it...like not revising for my A-Levels...that nearly turned out badly...nearly...

Hey it'll work, its just transcoding and working in Red Alert that's going to take forever. Just as long as you convert it to Pro Res it'll be fine for editing.

Ameer Azari
12-04-2009, 12:52 PM
Hey it'll work, its just transcoding and working in Red Alert that's going to take forever. Just as long as you convert it to Pro Res it'll be fine for editing.

That's awesome to hear. Now I don't have to go and blow $2,500 on a new computer...Base I/O Module...come to daddy...:D

Cynic
12-04-2009, 08:25 PM
I think too many people come on here and post the specs of their perfectly reasonable systems and are told that they won't be able to work with Scarlet unless they go out and spend at least $5000 on a Mac Pro. It's unnecessarily discouraging. While some people will be using the Scarlet to produce video for paying customers and on very tight deadlines and they might not be able to afford long render or transcode times, others might just be working on their own creative projects at their own pace. For them to be told without any caveat that they need a supercomputer to even be able to use a Scarlet is just dishonest. Everyone has different needs.

Personally, I'm going to buy a Scarlet and start in right away on my 2007 15" MacBook Pro. At some point I'll probably run out of storage and have to buy another RAID. At some point I'll get around to buying a larger display. At some point I will even buy a Mac Pro and perhaps a Red Rocket. However, I won't hold off on a Scarlet in the meantime and I'll make do with the workflow delays that go with my system.

If you have the money to buy an awesome computer and a Scarlet at the same time, then go for it. If you have the money for one or the other, buy the Scarlet and deal with the slower workflow until you can afford a better computer. You'll be pretty proficient by then and will be able to make the most of your new computer's power.

By the way, I'm absolutely not complaining about anyone in this particular thread. This is just something that pops into my head every time someone asks what kind of system they need in order to edit Scarlet footage, which is quite often.

fde101
12-04-2009, 10:13 PM
I'm on an iMac G5, so I need the new computer first.

Scarlet later...

johnvid
12-04-2009, 11:47 PM
When Ted was talking on the podcast he was saying 3500 for a mac, plus the RedRay and a card for the machine, sounded like about 15k for a good system, totally different ball game.

Pietro Impagliazzo
12-05-2009, 12:22 AM
I think too many people come on here and post the specs of their perfectly reasonable systems and are told that they won't be able to work with Scarlet unless they go out and spend at least $5000 on a Mac Pro. It's unnecessarily discouraging. While some people will be using the Scarlet to produce video for paying customers and on very tight deadlines and they might not be able to afford long render or transcode times, others might just be working on their own creative projects at their own pace. For them to be told without any caveat that they need a supercomputer to even be able to use a Scarlet is just dishonest. Everyone has different needs.

Personally, I'm going to buy a Scarlet and start in right away on my 2007 15" MacBook Pro. At some point I'll probably run out of storage and have to buy another RAID. At some point I'll get around to buying a larger display. At some point I will even buy a Mac Pro and perhaps a Red Rocket. However, I won't hold off on a Scarlet in the meantime and I'll make do with the workflow delays that go with my system.

If you have the money to buy an awesome computer and a Scarlet at the same time, then go for it. If you have the money for one or the other, buy the Scarlet and deal with the slower workflow until you can afford a better computer. You'll be pretty proficient by then and will be able to make the most of your new computer's power.

By the way, I'm absolutely not complaining about anyone in this particular thread. This is just something that pops into my head every time someone asks what kind of system they need in order to edit Scarlet footage, which is quite often.

What he said.

You can always go to RED Cine and transcode everything to 720P encoded in a light codec for editing.

I'm not very familiar with the conform process or tools for it, but I guess by now there's software for it, no matter the workflow.

I guess on Adobe workflow you can set a very low resolution debayer and you can edit in a cheap but still decent system.

Vegas workflow is cheaper and the R3D support is quite nicely (it already supports Color Science by now while the Adobe doesn't), but I'm not sure you can set the debayer res. quality like in the Adobe workflow.

The main concern for the home user would be backup. Perhaps ditching the R3D and transcoding all the material to ProRes and burning BDs would be a decent home solution.